21 Unbelievable Candid Photographs Of Elvis Presley In The Army

The singer that shocked a nation with his hips was then forced to take a break from his career to serve in its army. And lucky for us, a photographer was there to catch it all.

1. Elvis Presley is remembered like this:

Elvis Presley is remembered like this:

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Charles Trainor / Time & Life Pictures / Getty Images

The performer that scared a nation.

2. With one of the most passionate fandoms of all time.

With one of the most passionate fandoms of all time.

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Charles Trainor / Time & Life Pictures / Getty Images

3. But for a short time Elvis had to put his career on hold.

But for a short time Elvis had to put his career on hold.

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Don Cravens / Time Life Pictures / Getty Images

4. In 1958, he was drafted into military service.

In 1958, he was drafted into military service.

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Don Cravens / Time Life Pictures / Getty Images

5. According to The Elvis Encyclopedia by Adam Victor, Elvis said “The Army can do anything it wants with me.”

According to The Elvis Encyclopedia by Adam Victor, Elvis said "The Army can do anything it wants with me."

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Don Cravens / Time Life Pictures / Getty Images

6. And that he hoped to be treated just like any soldier.

And that he hoped to be treated just like any soldier.

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Don Cravens / Time Life Pictures / Getty Images

7. Any soldier with a photographer following him…

Any soldier with a photographer following him...

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Don Cravens / Time Life Pictures / Getty Images

8. That meant getting his hair cut.

That meant getting his hair cut.

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Don Cravens / Time Life Pictures / Getty Images

9. And being dressed in his army uniform.

And being dressed in his army uniform.

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Don Cravens / Time Life Pictures / Getty Images

10. Because he was not in Special Services, he was not able to give musical performances.

Because he was not in Special Services, he was not able to give musical performances.

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Don Cravens / Time Life Pictures / Getty Images

11. Or remain in touch with his adoring public.

Or remain in touch with his adoring public.

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Don Cravens / Time Life Pictures / Getty Images

12. So he made friends with his fellow soldiers.

So he made friends with his fellow soldiers.

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Lee Lockwood / Time Life Pictures / Getty Images

13. And played for them in private instead.

And played for them in private instead.

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Loomis Dean / Time Life Pictures / Getty Images

14. After training at Fort Hood, Elvis was assigned to the 3rd Armored Division in Friedberg, Germany.

After training at Fort Hood, Elvis was assigned to the 3rd Armored Division in Friedberg, Germany.

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Lee Lockwood / Time Life Pictures / Getty Images

15. Which is where he met 14-year-old Priscilla Beaulieu. Who he later married.

Which is where he met 14-year-old Priscilla Beaulieu. Who he later married.

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James Whitmore / Time & Life Pictures / Getty Images

16. At the end of his time in the army, Elvis held a press conference.

At the end of his time in the army, Elvis held a press conference.

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Lee Lockwood / Time Life Pictures / Getty Images

17. Fans surrounded the building in hopes of catching a glimpse of the star.

Fans surrounded the building in hopes of catching a glimpse of the star.

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Al Fenn / Time Life Pictures / Getty Images

18. It was announced that Presley had received his full Sergeant stripes.

It was announced that Presley had received his full Sergeant stripes.

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James Whitmore / Time & Life Pictures / Getty Images

19. And he was asked about his decision to serve as a soldier.

And he was asked about his decision to serve as a soldier.

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James Whitmore / Time & Life Pictures / Getty Images

“I was in a funny position. Actually, that’s the only way it could be. People were expecting me to mess up, to goof up in one way or another. They thought I couldn’t take it and so forth, and I was determined to go to any limits to prove otherwise, not only to the people who were wondering, but to myself”.

20. The next day he would leave Germany with Priscilla.

The next day he would leave Germany with Priscilla.

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Lee Lockwood / Time Life Pictures / Getty Images

21. And on March 5, he was discharged from the army.

And on March 5, he was discharged from the army.

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James Whitmore / Time & Life Pictures / Getty Images

11 Questions For Whoever Made Teen People’s Covers In 2001

1. Is A.J. McLean’s ramen noodle haircut, a boy band essential?

2. What prize did Britney Spears win?

3. Why didn’t Tina Knowles do a better job of coordinating their outfits?

4. Did the winner of the call convince Carson Daly to end his engagement to Tara Reid?

5. Why is JC Chasez rocking Midwestern soccer mom hair?

6. Did Freddie Prinz Jr. ever have another successful movie after She’s All That?

7. Was Kevin Richardson really one of the hottest guys in music? He wasn’t even the hottest guy in Backstreet.

8. How was Justin Timberlake not voted worst dressed?

9. Why is Teen People promoting tattoos?

10. Were NSYNC really ever bad boys?

11. Whatever happened to Ja Rule?

Epic Bicycle Kick Soccer Goal

 featured this video of Carlos Vela of the Spanish football team Real Sociedad performing an epic bicycle kick goal against Malaga. His technique is straight out of the sweet soccer movies handbook. 

 

English Footballer Quits Twitter After Whining About Massive Salary

Englishpounds

English soccer player Jamie O’Hara has quit Twitter after fans attacked him over asinine tweets whining about his huge salary and charitable obligations.

O’Hara’s tweet that incited fans most bemoaned the added stresses of professional soccer compared to his carefree days as a youth player, reading: “Things were so much easier when I earned 100pound a week on wts #stress.”

O’Hara now earns a £35,000 — or $56,000 — per week for the English soccer club Wolverhampton Wanderers. And he had more to educate his 175,000 followers about.

“Why do people think cos I earn good money I don’t have bills to pay we all pay tax an we have mortgages to pay, some people are deluded,” he wrote in one tweet.

That was followed by: “I wonder how many people are doing hospital visits this Xmas or giving clothing to the homeless this winter, or setting up a charity to raise money for hospitals.”

Predictably, fans and followers were quick to jump all over O’Hara for his posts, berating him for griping about earning more in one week than many people do in a year.

After the backlash, O’Hara announced that he was done on Twitter and his profile page now returns an error message.

Before shutting things down, O’Hara said the social network has “too many trolls on here with nothing nice to say.” Sports trolls have become an increasingly serious problem in the Twitter world, with many players receiving harsh abuse and even death threats after mistakes during competition. In this case, however, it’s not quite clear who was trolling who.

But O’Hara didn’t say he’s done with social media.

“I’ll be starting a private Facebook account and anyone who is a genuine fan can send me a friend request,” he wrote before fleeing Twitter.

Do you think O’Hara was right to quit Twitter after fan backlash, or did he bring it upon himself?

Thumbnail image courtesy Flicker, Images_of_Money

LGBT Leaders Find Bright Spot in Sochi Failures

Gayrussiaap

Gay rights activists carry rainbow flags as they march during a May Day rally in St. Petersburg, Russia, on May 1, 2013.
Image: Dmitry Lovetsky, File/Associated Press

More than a week after the 2014 Winter Olympics closing ceremony, the world’s attention has shifted 300 miles north from Sochi to the Crimean peninsula, where Russian President Vladimir Putin and Ukraine’s fledgling new government continue to teeter on the brink of war.

The escalating situation there has deflected conversation from what, just two weeks ago, was the world’s hottest Russia-related political topic: The current government’s record on gay rights. Many activists found it offensive that the Olympics were held in such a repressive country, but they also saw it as an opportunity. Could the games in Sochi become a pivotal moment for Russia’s LGBT community?

“The IOC Played The Staring Game With The LGBT Movement — And Won,” read BuzzFeed‘s headline just days after the closing ceremony on Feb. 26. “We failed in Sochi because we didn’t risk a thing,” said the same day’s headline on Outsports, a well-respected site for its coverage of LGBT issues in sports.

But gay rights activists who spoke with Mashable painted a more nuanced picture than those headlines. They say that, for all the things that didn’t change because of Sochi, plenty of victories can be counted — and used to build momentum toward helping gays in the countries that treat them worst.

“No, the IOC has not changed its policies, and, no, Putin has not changed his policies,” says Kevin Jennings, executive director of the Arcus Foundation, which which works to advance LGBT issues worldwide. “But it was a qualified success in the sense that, if our goal was for LGBT issues to not be swept under the rug and for the world to take notice, we did accomplish that.”

Activist arrested to start the Olympics

On Feb. 7, the day of the games’ opening ceremony, four gay rights activists were arrested in St. Petersburg under Russia’s controversial anti-“propaganda” law. Their crime: holding a banner quoting the Olympic Charter’s ban on discrimination of any kind.

Every time Jennings thought of watching Olympic events back stateside, he couldn’t bring himself to do so after remembering his Russian comrades who were arrested for that banner. But he did take cold comfort in the fact that the Feb. 7 arrest generated worldwide press coverage — just as he and others saw progress in Putin’s widely mocked insistence that gays were welcome at the Olympics as long as they “left kids alone.”

“I was talking to [author and activist] David Mixner about this, and he said, ‘We made one of the most powerful men in the world react to us,'” Jennings says. “A world leader like Putin, with his level of power? Fifteen years ago, he would have just laughed at us and wouldn’t have felt a need to defend or rationalize anything.”

Jennings’ Arcus Foundation backs the Russia Freedom Fund, which solicits donations that are sent directly to LGBT activists and allies in Russia. He says the fund has raised more than $500,000 over the past several months, thanks in large part to attention brought by the Sochi Olympics.

For many in Sochi, the line between opposition and celebration seemed hard to decipher. Before an Italian transgender activist was booted from the Olympic Park on Feb. 18, many mistook her for a clown because of her rainbow-themed clothing, the AP reported.

SochiActivist

A father and children look on as Vladimir Luxuria, left, a former Communist lawmaker in the Italian parliament and prominent crusader for transgender rights, speaks out about gay rights while walking through the Olympic Plaza at the 2014 Winter Olympics, Monday, Feb. 17, 2014, in Sochi, Russia.

Image: David Goldman/Associated Press

Moments like that — and the bombastic rainbow opening ceremony outfits that the German Olympians wore — were a “constant reminder that this was there, even if the people who organized the games didn’t want it to be,” says Dustin Lance Black, screenwriter for the film Milk and cofounder of Uprising of Love, an organization that works to support gay Russians.

“With LGBT issues and frankly, any civil rights issues, awareness and visibility are most important,” Black says. “Creating equality is about creating understanding. That only starts to happen when there’s a light shined on an issue. Of course there were missed opportunities in Sochi, but here the Olympics provided that light that’s needed.”

Many dangers persist for gays Russia

The unique challenges LGBT people faced in Russia existed long before the Olympics, and they’ll continue to persist long after the Paralympics end on March 16. No one doubts any of that.

But outrage over the obstacles they met reached a crescendo on June 30, 2013, when Putin signed into law a piece of legislation “propaganda of nontraditional sexual practices” that could in any conceivable way be seen by people under age 18.

It’s not an outright ban on homosexuality, but its hazy definition of “propaganda” helps the law essentially ban any positive discussion of gay life or gay rights in public forums such as schools or the media. It’s the law that was used to arrest the activists on the day of the Olympics’ opening ceremony.

It’s also the reason the Russian Open Games had to put this disclaimer on its otherwise innocuous website.

OpenGamesWarming

The Russian Open Games were a multi-day jamboree for international gay athletes and their supporters in Moscow, held between the Olympics and Paralympics in Sochi. Challenges of the Open Games underscore the harsh climate that remains in Russia despite the incremental victories activists cite from Sochi.

The day before the Open Games were scheduled to begin, four sports venues and a Hilton hotel abruptly backed out of agreements to host events. Open Games organizers are convinced they did so under official pressure. The next day, a bomb threat was called into the gay nightclub that was supposed to host the Open Games opening ceremony. The following day, a morning smoke bomb attack at one venue canceled swimming and basketball competitions.

OpenGamesCops

Police officers walk out of the building where the LGBT Open Games were set to open in Moscow, Russia, Wednesday, Feb. 26, 2014.

Image: Alexander Zemlianichenko/Associated Press

Nonetheless, Open Games activists and organizers pressed on and the event was completed March 2.

So now what happens?

Black, Jennings and others do count some victories from the two-week Winter Olympics, but they’re also clear on something else.

“That [closing ceremony] moment when the Olympic flame was extinguished was the moment our real work began,” Black says.

So, just what is the “real work” that comes next? Black and Jennings say keeping attention on the situation in Russia, whether through consistent press coverage or celebrity statements, is one key. Direct support is another.

If you’re an LGBT person or ally, Black and Jennings say, consider spending your next vacation in Russia working alongside gay rights activists there. If you can’t go, they recommend sending money through the Russia Freedom Fund or other channels. And if Sochi ticks you off but you’d rather spend of some of that energy elsewhere, they’re quick to remind that homosexuality is still a crime in more than 75 countries.

“We had this big, bright flame with the Olympics,” Black says. “Now we have to keep the attention on Russia and other places where LGBT equality is even further behind now that that flame is gone. We have to fill that void with our light and our truth.”

It’s highly likely much of the controversy surround gay rights and Sochi will play out again, at other lionized global sporting events. The 2014 World Cup kicks off this June in Brazil, where LGBT people live largely free of official harassment. But the 2018 World Cup returns to — you guessed it — Russia. Then the 2022 World Cup happens in Qatar, where homosexual acts are illegal.

At least one prominent soccer player has already spoken out against those host countries, and bitterness is sure to intensify. Knowing the bureaucratic, logistical and financial challenges of staging events of this scale, however, it’s all but impossible they get moved.

But what does remains to be seen is what type of bigger world the Russia and Qatar cups take place in four and eight years down the line — as well as which countries will be selected to host subsequent Olympic-sized events. Those outcomes, more than any pronouncement we’ve seen this year, will be the true test of whether Sochi was a success or failure for the gay rights movement.

SochiClosing

The Olympic flame burns at sunset before the closing ceremony of the 2014 Winter Olympics, Sunday, Feb. 23, 2014, in Sochi, Russia.

Image: Matt Slocum/Associated Press

This Nigerian Table Tennis Player Celebrates His Bronze Metal In The Strangest Way Possible

Turn down for what?

1. When Nigeria’s Ojo Onaolapo helped secure a 3-1 victory over India at the Commonwealth Games, he had a fairly interesting celebration to go along with the win.

James Dator / Via vine.co

2. Right after his teammates hoisted him in the air…

Right after his teammates hoisted him in the air...

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ANDREJ ISAKOVIC / Via GETTY IMAGES

3. Onaolapo decided that it would be a good idea to give the crowd a peak at his baby blue underwear and cleanly shaven chest.

Onaolapo decided that it would be a good idea to give the crowd a peak at his baby blue underwear and cleanly shaven chest.

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James Dator / Via vine.co

4. Oh, Ojo… What kind of celebration would you have given us if you won the gold?

Not Marriage Material: 4 Reasons I’m Addicted To The Single Life

My name is Prashanthi Musapet, and Im here today because Im addicted to being single.

I’m sorry you had to find out this way, Dad.

Nope, your little girl is not dreaming of exchanging vows with her Prince Charming in an elaborate ceremony, with all our friends and family watching.

The funny thing is, growing up, this is all I’d ever wanted. I shared many young girls’ dreams of one day becoming the picture-perfect housewife and soccer mom.

My life would follow the stereotypical schedule:Find my soulmate in college. Get married right after college.

One year later, live in an adorable house in the suburbs. Somewhere down the line, give birth to the cutest little boy and girl on the planet.

So the story goes.

But as time went on, I kept pushing that dream further and further away.

Maybe in the next year or two. Maybe when Im 30.

Then, it finally dawned on me: I didnt want any of it to come true.

Thats when I realized — wait for it — Im not marriage material.

Here arefour reasons that pretty much sum up why:

1. Im not ready to give up me yet.

When you get married, me automatically becomes we:”We cant make it this weekend or were considering buying a new couch.

Yeah. No thanks.

Ionly want my favorite shows on the DVR.

I’mnot willing to share the leftovers from my favorite restaurant the next day.

Plus, I want to be able to make a rash, split-second decision on my own. I want to splurge on a way-too-expensive food processor Ill never use, only to regret it later.

Most people can agree marriage relies on compromise in order to be successful.

So if you’re not the type of person willing to make sacrifices, you probably shouldnt be walking down the aisle any time soon.

2. I can’t commit to the long-term on anything.

Whether its a new job, place to live, hobby or relationship, Im all in for a couple of years (three max).

After that, Im running for the door, ready for the next adventure.

Unfortunately, my passion for most things comes with a limited warranty.

I love the experiences new things bring, but when the new wears out, I check out.

Im not sure if its because Im a Gemini and we tend to get bored easily, or if its just that Im addicted to the adrenaline of new experiences.

The same goes for my relationships with men.

“The honeymoon period” is so euphoric.

Hes so amazing. Hes all I think about. I cant wait to see him again.

Eventually, all that euphoria turns into “Hes kind of annoying.”

“God, he’s so moody. Im feeling smothered. Get me out of here.”

3. I want to have my cake and eat it too.

Example: You go shopping, and youre interested in two pairs of jeans.

You pay for one, only to immediately regret your decision once you leave the store.

Can you imagine having buyers remorse with the person you’ve promised to stay with until you die?

That could be a really, really long time.

One day, youre into the bad boy with the tattoo sleeves and a motorcycle.

The next day, its all about the socially-awkward nerd with big ambitions and a solid 401 (k).

There are too many options to settle down.

They say variety is the spice of life, and I like things really spicy.

4. My bucket list doesnt include a plus one.

What if I finally get my dream job and have to move across the country tomorrow?

What if said dream job turns out to be a nightmare, and I decide to peace out so I can travel around the world and settlein Ireland?

Oh, wait. I can.

Decisions like these pretty much affect me and only me.

Right now, Im just responsible for myself, so I can leave everything at the drop of a hat without impacting anyone elses future.


Everyone I’ve talked to seems to be only interested in eventually finding a life partner.

It got me thinking, “Am I alone in the desire to fly solo for the foreseeable future?”

I turned to licensed psychotherapist, Denise Limongello, LMSW for answers:

Not everyone is equipped for marriage or life partnership.

Most people, however, do seek a long-term, if not a life-long, companion.

So those who do not wish to marry could be considered the minority. The decision, however, does not directly correlate to age, but rather to personal preference and to gender.

Studies indicate that most individuals who do not seek a life partner or marriage are typically males.

So maybe I’m in the minority, but for now, I’m enjoying and embracing the single life.

My attitude, though, may change in the next 15 years, when the thought of being a cat lady doesn’t seem as appealing.